Friday, July 24, 2015

Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along: Day 15 (Conclusion)



Welcome to Day 15 of the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along - the last day of our three-week event!

I've had an absolute blast experiencing Persuasion with you all - from discussing the book together to our Twitter movie watch-along - and celebrating the release of The Prayers of Jane Austen. To anyone and everyone who left a comment, participated in the giveaways, and/or simply expressed excitement for this event and the books we've read: Thank you. Your enthusiasm and friendship mean the world!

If you'd like to look back through our discussions of Persuasion and The Prayers of Jane Austen, just click on the read-along tag or the button in the sidebar. (Some of the participants posted on their blogs, as well: My Favorite Pastime, Flowers of Quiet Happiness) You can also check out the fun we've had on other social media sites: #InspiredByAusten on Twitter and the Inspired by Austen Pinterest board.

And one more thing: Terry Glaspey, editor of The Prayers of Jane Austen, has a new website! I'm sure he'd love it if you popped on over to check it out (and maybe order a signed copy of the book from him :)).

Now, we still have one last discussion scheduled for this event. Today we're talking about the third part of Jane Austen's prayers from The Prayers of Jane Austen (the lovely book that inspired this whole read-along!).


~ ~ ~

The Prayers of Jane Austen: Part III

Discussion Format: One quote to ponder, one observation, and one question for each day's reading.

Quote to Ponder

"Teach us, Almighty Father, to consider this solemn truth, as we should do, that we may feel the importance of every day, and every hour as it passes..." - Jane Austen

Observation

This is such a lovely concluding prayer, with a theme of making the most of our time, our blessings, and our relationships. It addresses the paradox of needing to truly live each moment, but also needing to understand that our journeys require patience. It's the perspective of eternity, to realize that all we have is now, but this "now" is shaping us bit by bit for the endless "now" that awaits beyond time.

Don't the sentiments expressed in this prayer fit well with the lessons of Persuasion?
  • Time is short; don't let pride hold you back from the love you're meant to give.
  • Hardships come and meaningful things take time, so we must follow Jesus's example of patience and endurance.
  • We all mess up, and the knowledge of this ought to make us humble before God and with each other.
  • All in all, God works all things for our good (Romans 8:28), and we're deeply and truly blessed.
  • We need God's mercy to save us from our self-centered and hard-hearted tendencies.
  • "Everyone needs compassion," as the worship song "Mighty to Save" (Hillsong) sums up. We've all suffered in our own ways. We all need love.

I really want to "feel the importance of every day, and every hour as it passes." I think I need to let myself feel that more, and then let that understanding better influence how I choose to use my time.

It's a constant battle, but it's one worth fighting through prayer, with God's grace.

Question

Did this prayer speak to you and your current situation in life? If so, how?

Giveaway!

Today's the last day to enter for a chance to win a hardcover copy of The Prayers of Jane Austen, which includes an introduction and essay from Terry Glaspey on Austen's faith, in addition to the prayers and beautiful illustrations. Be sure to submit your entries using the Rafflecopter form below!

(Giveaway open to US residents only. Prize donated by the book's editor, Terry Glaspey. Thanks, Terry!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway
~ ~ ~

I had such a great time with this read-along that I'd love to do another! This has provided fun motivation to finally read more of Jane Austen's work and to tackle a classic that I might not have gotten to otherwise. I hope you've enjoyed the experience, as well!

You might have noticed the poll I had in the sidebar this past week or so. From the seven who cast their votes, we had two votes each for a read-along of Emma or Pride and Prejudice, and three votes for Northanger Abbey. For some reason, it surprised me that Northanger Abbey would pull ahead...but why should I be surprised when we're talking about Henry Tilney? I mean, he has such an understanding of muslin! ;) (Plus, I'm sure people are probably less familiar with that title than the other two.)

In an ideal world, I picture doing a read-along of Northanger Abbey in October (perfect for the month of Halloween, am I right?), Emma in February (Valentine's Day!), and Pride and Prejudice next summer. But I hesitate to set any firm schedule just yet until we get closer to those dates. I think it might be good to have some recovery time in between the read-alongs, for sure. ;) Know that I'll be thinking about future possibilities, though, and I appreciate knowing what interests everyone! 

It makes me happy to think of doing more read-alongs and watch-alongs with my #BookBesties (← Rissi's awesome hashtag)!

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along: Day 14



Welcome to Day 14 of the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along! Today we're concluding Persuasion and tomorrow we'll conclude The Prayers of Jane Austen. (Bittersweet cheers that we've made it!)

You can catch up on previous posts from this three-week discussion by checking out the read-along tag or by clicking the button in the sidebar.

Today we're going to discuss chapters 23 and 24 of Persuasion. If you came prepared, go ahead and share your thoughts below! Otherwise, feel free to check in later today after you've had a chance to read today's chapters. Can't wait to hear your thoughts!

P.S. If you're a blogger, please feel free to put together your own post using the button above and linking back to the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along tag, if you'd prefer to participate in the discussion that way. :)

~ ~ ~

Persuasion Chapters 23 and 24

Discussion Format: One quote to ponder, one observation, and one question for each day's reading.

Quote to Ponder

"Such a letter was not to be soon recovered from."

[This, my friends, is what I would call an understatement! As I said in a tweet after reading it...

That pretty much sums it up. *blissful sigh*]

Honorable Mentions:

[Because this ending has so many good quotes!]

"If I could explain to you all this, and all that a man can bear and do, and glories to do, for the sake of these treasures of his existence!"
- Captain Harville

[How utterly beautiful is the phrase "treasures of his existence" to describe a man's wife and children?]

"There could be only the most proper alacrity, a most obliging compliance for public view; and smiles reined in and spirits dancing in private rapture."

[Another gorgeous phrase - "spirits dancing in private rapture." Be still my heart! Or should I say, dance on, my heart!]

"There they returned again into the past, more exquisitely happy, perhaps, in their reunion than when it had been first projected; more tender, more tried, more fixed in a knowledge of each other's character, truth, and attachment; more equal to act, more justified in acting."

"There was nothing less for Lady Russell to do, than to admit that she had been pretty completely wrong, and to take up a new set of opinions and of hopes."

Observation

After reading this final section, I wonder if perhaps this book should have been titled Pride and Persuasion, because Captain Wentworth was long held back by pride and Anne had been persuaded to turn him away. ;) But this ending does bring about such satisfying resolutions for all that heartache and separation!

It's helpful to hear the reasons why Wentworth behaved the way he did throughout the book. And it's just lovely to know that his feelings for Anne remained, no matter how he tried to forget them or snuff them out.

One thing I found especially gratifying was the forgiveness and healing permeating the last chapter (although sadly Anne's family remains self-centered as always). Two of Anne's dearest friends, Lady Russell and Mrs. Smith, become Wentworth's allies, as well. Wentworth chooses not to harbor ill will against Lady Russell, and he completely champions Mrs. Smith in her need, atoning for Mr. Elliot's unkindness toward her. How sweet is that?

And while we're reminded that the life of a sailor is uncertain and the sacrifices can be great, we're left with the statement that Anne "gloried in being a sailor's wife."

I think Anne might echo Mrs. Croft's words from chapter 8: "I can safely say, that the happiest part of my life has been spent on board a ship. While we were together, you know, there was nothing to be feared."

I think Anne and Wentworth have a happy future ahead of them. ♥

Question

We've finished the book! What are your final thoughts? Where does Persuasion rank among the Jane Austen stories you know and love?

Giveaway!

Don't forget to log your giveaway entries this week using the Rafflecopter form below for a chance to win a hardcover copy of The Prayers of Jane Austen!

(Giveaway open to US residents only. Prize donated by the book's editor, Terry Glaspey. Thanks, Terry!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Which quote to ponder, observation, and question/response would you like to share?

Join us tomorrow for a special discussion of one of Jane Austen's prayers! (If you'd like to read along, we'll be chatting about Part III of The Prayers of Jane Austen.)

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along: Day 13



Welcome to Day 13 of the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along! You can follow along on this three-week discussion of Persuasion and The Prayers of Jane Austen by checking out the read-along tag or by clicking the button in the sidebar.

Today we're going to discuss chapters 21 and 22 of Persuasion. If you came prepared, go ahead and share your thoughts below! Otherwise, feel free to check in later today after you've had a chance to read today's chapters. Can't wait to hear your thoughts!

P.S. If you're a blogger, please feel free to put together your own post using the button above and linking back to the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along tag, if you'd prefer to participate in the discussion that way. :)

~ ~ ~

Persuasion Chapters 21 and 22

Discussion Format: One quote to ponder, one observation, and one question for each day's reading.

Quote to Ponder

"How she might have felt had there been no Captain Wentworth in the case, was not worth enquiry; for there was a Captain Wentworth; and be the conclusion of the present suspense good or bad, her affection would be his forever."

Honorable Mentions:

"What wild imaginations one forms where dear self is concerned! How sure to be mistaken!"  - Anne Elliot

"Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left." - Anne Elliot

Observation

The truth is out! Crisis averted, Anne's good opinion converted. (Couldn't resist!)

After watching the 1995 movie adaptation (hugs to you all who joined in!), it seems to me that the book's reality is even more unpleasant than the movie's. We're presented with all sorts of little details about Mr. Elliot's unkindness to Anne's family, to her dear friend Mrs. Smith (and the late Mr. Smith), and to his late wife. I appreciate Anne's willingness to give Mr. Elliot the benefit of the doubt and to distrust any gossip, but her dear friend has quite a bit to say against the man, making his general disposition and selfishness quite clear.

(Although I must say, I think Mrs. Smith's excuses for not coming out and revealing everything about Mr. Elliot right away flimsy at best. I would think that if Anne were going to marry Mr. Elliot, that she should be even more entitled to a warning! I greatly admire Mrs. Smith from former chapters, but I don't agree with her reasoning in this section.)

As for chapter 22, I feel like there are some interesting tidbits about Mr. Elliot and Captain Wentworth (love how obvious Wentworth's interest is in all things concerning Anne, even if he's still being too stubborn!), but overall it seems more of a set-up for the final scenes. Either that, or I was just too tired to completely appreciate what I was reading. ;) (Confession: I did close my eyes and rest for a bit while I was in the midst of the chapter. I think this section was longer than most of our other daily readings!)

Can't believe we'll be discussing the last two chapters tomorrow!

Question

If you were in Mrs. Smith's position, what would you have done? That is to say, if you knew some pretty awful things about the person your friend might be marrying, would you stay silent in hopes that things would work out all right, or would you tell your friend what you know, even if it could alter her future/relationship?

P.S. Would it make a difference to your response if you were living in Austen's time instead of today?

Giveaway!

Don't forget to log your giveaway entries this week using the Rafflecopter form below for a chance to win a hardcover copy of The Prayers of Jane Austen!

(Giveaway open to US residents only. Prize donated by the book's editor, Terry Glaspey. Thanks, Terry!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Which quote to ponder, observation, and question/response would you like to share?

Join us tomorrow to discuss the last two chapters of the book: chapters 23 and 24!

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along: Day 12



Welcome to Day 12 of the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along! You can follow along on this three-week discussion of Persuasion and The Prayers of Jane Austen by checking out the read-along tag or by clicking the button in the sidebar.

Today we're going to discuss chapters 19 and 20 of Persuasion. If you came prepared, go ahead and share your thoughts below! Otherwise, feel free to check in later today after you've had a chance to read today's chapters. Can't wait to hear your thoughts!

P.S. If you're a blogger, please feel free to put together your own post using the button above and linking back to the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along tag, if you'd prefer to participate in the discussion that way. :)

~ ~ ~

Don't Forget!


You're invited to join us for a special viewing of Persuasion (1995 version) tonight! Here are the details:
Who: You, me, and whoever wants to join in!
What: A watch-along of Persuasion (1995), with commentary to be live-tweeted during the viewing
When: Tonight at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST 
Where: Twitter (#InspiredByAusten; I tweet with the handle @SeasonsHumility)
Why: Because you know you want to watch the movie now! ;) 
~ ~ ~

Persuasion Chapters 19 and 20

Discussion Format: One quote to ponder, one observation, and one question for each day's reading.

Quote to Ponder

"A man does not recover from such a devotion of the heart to such a woman. He ought not—he does not." - Captain Wentworth

Honorable Mention:

"She is pretty I think; Anne Elliot; very pretty, when one comes to look at her. It is not the fashion to say so, but I confess I admire her more than her sister."
"Oh! so do I."
"And so do I. No comparison. But the men are all wild after Miss Elliot. Anne is too delicate for them."

Observation

Captain Wentworth, your heart is betraying you again. But oh, how we love it! Right, fellow readers? ;)

I'll just sum up this section briefly...

Anne: Renewed hope
Wentworth: Revealed feelings
Wentworth's circle: Really perceptive
Anne's circle: Really frustrating
Mr. Elliot: Really bad timing

Question

Let's discuss Captain Wentworth's famous line (the "Quote to Ponder" above). Do you believe it's possible for someone to "recover" from deep feelings of true love? Or does that sense of "devotion" stay with the person forever, regardless of where else life might take them and whether or not the love is ever reciprocated?

Giveaway!

Don't forget to log your giveaway entries this week using the Rafflecopter form below for a chance to win a hardcover copy of The Prayers of Jane Austen!

(Giveaway open to US residents only. Prize donated by the book's editor, Terry Glaspey. Thanks, Terry!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Which quote to ponder, observation, and question/response would you like to share?

Join us tomorrow to discuss chapters 21 and 22!

Monday, July 20, 2015

Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along: Day 11



Welcome to Day 11 of the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along! You can follow along on this three-week discussion of Persuasion and The Prayers of Jane Austen by checking out the read-along tag or by clicking the button in the sidebar.

Today we're going to discuss chapters 17 and 18 of Persuasion. If you came prepared, go ahead and share your thoughts below! Otherwise, feel free to check in later today after you've had a chance to read today's chapters. Can't wait to hear your thoughts!

P.S. If you're a blogger, please feel free to put together your own post using the button above and linking back to the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along tag, if you'd prefer to participate in the discussion that way. :)

~ ~ ~

Persuasion Chapters 17 and 18

Discussion Format: One quote to ponder, one observation, and one question for each day's reading.

Quote to Ponder

"Here was that elasticity of mind, that disposition to be comforted, that power of turning readily from evil to good, and of finding employment which carried her out of herself, which was from nature alone. It was the choicest gift of Heaven" (emphasis added).

[This is another chapter with a wealth of noteworthy quotes. Had to share some of my other favorites below!]

Honorable Mentions:

"Hers is a line for seeing human nature; and she has a fund of good sense and observation, which, as a companion, make her infinitely superior to thousands of those who having only received 'the best education in the world,' know nothing worth attending to." - Mrs. Smith

"There are so many who forget to think seriously till it is almost too late." - Mrs. Smith

"She [Anne] prized the frank, the open-hearted, the eager character beyond all others. Warmth and enthusiasm did captivate her still. She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped."

"There, take my arm; that's right; I do not feel comfortable if I have not a woman there." - Admiral Croft

[Ah, Admiral Croft...that charmer! Doesn't it seem like Austen must have had a wonderful time creating the Admiral and his wife? I bet she simply fell in love with them!]

"Do not you think, Miss Elliot, we had better try to get him [Captain Wentworth] to Bath?" - Admiral Croft

[My response? Um, hello - yes!!!]

Observation

At the beginning of chapter 18, it is said of the Crofts that "they were people whom her [Anne's] heart turned to very naturally."

One point that seems so sweetly featured in these two chapters is that the company we choose to keep - and the company we're drawn to - can say quite a bit about our own character. While Anne's father and sister disdain her for choosing a poor widow's company over their wealthy and high-class connections, it's Anne's friends who have so much wisdom and admirable examples and kindness to impart to her. And Anne is the better for it! Even though Mr. Elliot's intentions are in question, I think he got it right when he considered Anne "a most extraordinary woman; in her temper, manners, mind, a model of female excellence."

Indeed!

I loved the scenes in this chapter with Mrs. Smith and with Admiral Croft. Mrs. Smith's attitude is so inspiring! I was thinking today about singleness (bear with me; I'm going somewhere with this!). I suppose bridal showers will do that to a girl, even if she's happy for the bride-to-be and glad to be a part of the festivities. :) I decided that one of the hardest things about being single is the feeling of missing out on a rite of passage. And unlike natural rites of passage (like growing into womanhood) or ones you can earn (like getting your education), this particular rite is one you have no real control over. And sometimes it's just so darn hard to accept that and to not feel left out or unwanted!

But here in this book is Mrs. Smith, someone almost entirely cast aside through circumstances beyond her control. Anne lists the poor woman's hardships: she lost the man she loved and also her respected position in society all at once; she lost her wealth; she has no children to care for her; she lives in a small and dismal residence; she needs help getting from one room to the other; she can hardly do anything for herself. And yet Anne observes that Mrs. Smith "had moments only of languor and depression" vs. "hours of occupation and enjoyment."

It puzzles Anne, who determines to understand it. She comes to the conclusion that it is a part of Mrs. Smith's very character, "that power of turning readily from evil to good."

I'd like to add, if I may, that perhaps that power isn't just something that you have or don't have, and that's the end of it. While I believe it might be harder for some personalities more than others to seek the positive, the power to do it lies with the God, through whom we "can do all things" (Philippians 4:13).

And one of the other interesting things about Anne's observation? She refers to Mrs. Smith's "elasticity of mind." That phrase, coupled with the "moments only of languor and depression" paint a picture of honest struggles. Yes, "evil" and depressing thoughts come to us all, especially when circumstances are painful. But it's the "elasticity" - the choice to quickly switch gears and focus on the good - that we need. (Not negating time for grieving or honestly pouring out our hearts, of course! As Ecclesiastes 3:1 says, there is "a time to every purpose under the heaven." I'm just speaking of the general tendency of our thoughts.)

May God more and more often bring to mind the truth that "all things work together for good to them that love God" (Romans 8:28). I know I can learn a lot from the example of Anne's friend! I would do well to accept what Anne calls "the choicest gift of Heaven." :)

Question

Who is your favorite character in the story so far, and what is it that you love most about him or her? What can you learn from that character?

Giveaway!

Don't forget to log your giveaway entries this week using the Rafflecopter form below for a chance to win a hardcover copy of The Prayers of Jane Austen!

(Giveaway open to US residents only. Prize donated by the book's editor, Terry Glaspey. Thanks, Terry!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Which quote to ponder, observation, and question/response would you like to share?

Join us tomorrow to discuss chapters 19 and 20!

Friday, July 17, 2015

Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along: Day 10



Welcome to Day 10 of the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along! You can follow along on this three-week discussion of Persuasion and The Prayers of Jane Austen by checking out the read-along tag or by clicking the button in the sidebar.

Today we're discussing the second part of Jane Austen's prayers from The Prayers of Jane Austen (the lovely book that inspired this whole read-along!). But first, here are a few links you should definitely check out...
  • In addition to the read-along giveaways (you still have today to enter this week's giveaway - see the form at the bottom of the post!), there's another giveaway of the book happening on Harvest House's Facebook page. More chances to win this lovely book for your nightstand or for a friend? Why, yes! 
  • Did you know this read-along conversation can also be found on other social media sites? Check out the hashtag #InspiredByAusten on Twitter to chat with us, and/or visit the Inspired By Austen Pinterest board to take a visual journey through the read-along and all things Austen. (Leave a comment if you'd like to be added to the board!)
(Have you been participating in the read-along via your blog? Or have you written a review of Persuasion or The Prayers of Jane Austen that you'd like to share? Leave a link in the comments, and I can include it in one of next week's posts!)

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You're Invited to a Twitter Watch-Along!



Kara (@flowersquiet) and I have had an absolute blast in recent months with events we like to call "watch-alongs." :) Basically, we meet up on Twitter and begin watching a movie at the same time, proceeding to tweet our observations and favorite quotes and all the goodness of the characters and story. Fun, am I right?? It's the next best thing to actually getting all your blogging friends together in front of the TV in your living room!

Well, we'd like to invite you to join us for a special viewing of Persuasion (1995 version) next week! Here are the details:
Who: You, me, and whoever wants to join in!
What: A watch-along of Persuasion (1995), with commentary to be live-tweeted during the viewing
When: Tuesday, July 21st at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST
Where: Twitter (#InspiredByAusten; I tweet with the handle @SeasonsHumility)
Why: Because you know you want to watch the movie now! ;)
*Note: I hope this time works all right for everyone! Because I work until 5:00, I can't really start much sooner, and I know we wouldn't want to start any later, or we'd be keeping the East-Coasters up all night! But if the details change, I'll be sure to let you all know.

~ ~ ~

The Prayers of Jane Austen: Part II

Discussion Format: One quote to ponder, one observation, and one question for each day's reading.

Quote to Ponder

"We bless Thee for every comfort of our past and present existence...imploring their continuance from They Fatherly goodness, with a more grateful sense of them, than they have hitherto excited."
- Jane Austen

Observation

I think this line sums up this poignant prayer well: "We are helpless and dependent; graciously preserve us."

Austen's humility rings clear in her desire for mercy and the strength to do better...in her gratitude and her longing to be even more grateful in the future...in her requests for the preservation of herself and her loved ones. The attitude of this prayer is admirable, and I could certainly learn from its example of honesty and reverence!

I believe I tend to take way too much for granted and don't appreciate my blessings as I ought. Austen's reminder to have a heart that's growing in its sense of gratitude is much-needed.

And not only does this prayer serve as a reminder to speak words of gratitude and praise to God, but it also reminds me that I should live in a way that expresses my gratitude. Does my life reflect the excitement of a thankful heart? Do I show my gratitude to God in the way I spend my time and through the choices I make?

Those last questions strike a nerve for me. The way I spend my free time and prioritize my activities and exercise generosity - those are all areas where I especially need God's mercy and strength to do better, to develop "a more grateful sense of [my blessings], than they have hithero excited."

Question

Did this prayer speak to you and your current situation in life? If so, how?

Giveaway!

Today's the last day to log your entries for this week's giveaway! Fill out the Rafflecopter form below for a chance to win a hardcover copy of The Prayers of Jane Austen. (You'll have one more chance to win this book next week!)

(Giveaway open to US residents only. Prize donated by the book's editor, Terry Glaspey. Thanks, Terry!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway
We'll resume our Persuasion read-along on Monday (discussing chapters 17 and 18)!

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along: Day 9



Welcome to Day 9 of the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along! You can follow along on this three-week discussion of Persuasion and The Prayers of Jane Austen by checking out the read-along tag or by clicking the button in the sidebar.

Today we're going to discuss chapters 15 and 16 of Persuasion. If you came prepared, go ahead and share your thoughts below! Otherwise, feel free to check in later today after you've had a chance to read today's chapters. Can't wait to hear your thoughts!

P.S. If you're a blogger, please feel free to put together your own post using the button above and linking back to the Persuasion and Prayers Read-Along tag, if you'd prefer to participate in the discussion that way. :)

~ ~ ~

Persuasion Chapters 15 and 16

Discussion Format: One quote to ponder, one observation, and one question for each day's reading.

Quote to Ponder

"My idea of good company, Mr. Elliot, is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company."

"You are mistaken," said he gently, "that is not good company; that is the best."

(Side note: If that doesn't describe our #BookBesties / #InspiredByAusten group on Twitter, then I don't know what does!)

Observation

These two chapters show some interesting developments on the Mr. Elliot front... The man is a mystery!

As Anne points out, "She had the sensation of there being something more than immediately appeared."

I almost kind of hoped Mr. Elliot was keen on visiting the family because he knew Anne would eventually come. (Silly me - they never even spoke when they first me, so how was he supposed to know who she was?) But since that wasn't his aim...now I'm definitely suspicious. And I'm proud of Anne for being on her guard while still appreciating his friendship and attention!

I will certainly say this for Mr. Elliot: Regardless of his reasons for being there, I'm happy for Anne's sake that she has someone (besides Lady Russell, to a degree) to reach out to her and admire her while in Bath. Her family's selfishness is both sad and aggravating.

But with all this talk of Mr. Elliot, this little line must not be overlooked: "[Mr. Elliot] gave her to understand that he had looked at her with some earnestness. She knew it well; and she remembered another person's look also" (emphasis added).

Question

If you were in Anne's place, how would you get along in Bath?

(How would you handle the rudeness and peculiarities of your family? In what ways would you try to amuse yourself? Would you trust Mr. Elliot and seek to continue your acquaintance with him?)

Giveaway!

Don't forget to log your giveaway entries this week using the Rafflecopter form below for a chance to win a hardcover copy of The Prayers of Jane Austen!

(Giveaway open to US residents only. Prize donated by the book's editor, Terry Glaspey. Thanks, Terry!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Which quote to ponder, observation, and question/response would you like to share?

Join us tomorrow for a special discussion of one of Jane Austen's prayers! (If you'd like to read along, we'll be chatting about Part II of The Prayers of Jane Austen.)